Genital Warts Surveillance Network Report 2004 – 2015

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Research program: 
Year published: 
2016
Genital Warts Surveillance Network Report 2004 – 2015
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Description: 

The Genital Warts Surveillance Network is a sentinel surveillance system to monitor trends in the diagnosis of genital warts in Australia. The network comprises 54 sexual health clinics in all states and territories of the country. The aim of the network is to determine the population effects of the national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program by monitoring the proportion of patients diagnosed with genital warts, from various populations.

Key findings: 
  • The results show that among Australian born women, aged 21 years or younger and thus eligible for free HPV vaccine, 11.7% were diagnosed with genital warts in 2007; declining to 0.8% in 2015. Among Australian born women, aged 21 – 30 years, most of whom had been eligible for free HPV vaccine by the later years, 12.1% were diagnosed with genital warts in 2007; declining to 2.4% in 2015. The proportion of women aged >30 years diagnosed with genital warts declined slightly from 5.9% in 2007 to 3.8% in 2015.
  • Among Australian born heterosexual men aged 21 years or younger, 12.6% were diagnosed with genital warts in 2007, declining to 0.9% in 2015; and among Australian born heterosexual men aged 21 – 30 years, 20.0% were diagnosed in 2007, declining to 5.6% in 2015. There was also a decrease in genital warts diagnoses among heterosexual men older than 30 years, from 12.2% in 2007 to 7.1% in 2015.
  • The proportion of patients diagnosed with genital warts has declined in both urban and non-urban settings. In urban areas, warts diagnoses declined from 14.8% in 2007 to 3.7% in 2015.
  • Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, aged 21 years or younger and thus eligible for free HPV vaccine, 6.4% were diagnosed with genital warts in 2007 with only 0.6% diagnosed in 2015. Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, aged 21 – 30 years, most of whom were eligible for free HPV vaccine in later years, 4.2% were diagnosed with genital warts in 2007 dropping to 1.2% in 2014.
  • Among heterosexual Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, aged 21 years or younger, 5.5% were diagnosed with genital warts in 2007, with no cases diagnosed in 2014 or 2015. Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heterosexual men aged 21 – 30 years, 11.2% were diagnosed with genital warts in 2007, declining to 4.5% in 2015.
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