Other Surveillance Reports

Needle Syringe Program National Minimum Data Collection Report 2016

The Australian Government Department of Health, through the BBV and STI Prevention Programme, contracted the Kirby Institute to develop a Needle Syringe Program National Minimum Data Collection (NSP NMDC) to support the National Strategies for blood borne viral infections and sexually transmissible diseases and to complement the Australian Needle and Syringe Program Survey National Data Report.

States and territories have a strong interest in the ability to monitor trends over time and compare data across jurisdictions to help inform policy and practice.

National Prison Entrants' Bloodborne Virus and Risk Behaviour Survey Report 2004

Prisoner populations are associated with engaging in high risk behaviours, particularly injecting drug use. Consequently, they are at an increased risk of exposure to bloodborne viruses such as hepatitis C, hepatitis B and HIV. Studies have also shown that the correctional environment is a high risk environment for bloodborne virus transmission.

National Prison Entrants' Bloodborne Virus and Risk Behaviour Survey Report 2004 and 2007

Prisoner populations are characterised by engagement in a range of risk behaviours, most notably injecting drug use. Consequently they are at an increased risk of exposure to bloodborne viruses such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV. Previous Australian research had shown that hepatitis C is up to forty times higher in prisoners compared with the general community. Monitoring this population for the presence of blood-borne pathogens and trends in risk behaviours is important in planning effective prevention strategies for this population.

National Prison Entrants' Bloodborne Virus and Risk Behaviour Survey Report 2004, 2007 and 2010

Prisoner populations are characterised by engagement in a range of risk behaviours, most notably injecting drug use. Consequently they are at an increased risk of exposure to bloodborne viruses such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV. Previous Australian research has shown that hepatitis C is between thirty to forty times higher among prisoners compared with the general community. Therefore, surveillance of this population to detect the presence of bloodborne pathogens and identify trends in risk behaviours is important in planning effective prevention strategies.

National Prison Entrants' Bloodborne Virus and Risk Behaviour Survey Report 2004, 2007, 2010 and 2013

Prisoner populations are characterised by engagement in risk behaviours, most notably injecting drug use. Consequently they are at an increased risk of exposure to bloodborne viruses such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV. Previous Australian research has shown that hepatitis C is between thirty to forty times higher among prisoners compared with the general community. Surveillance of this population is important to monitor trends in the prevalence of bloodborne viruses and changes over time in risk behaviours.

Enhanced surveillance for newly acquired hepatitis C: Information for the General Practitioner

By law, all new diagnoses of hepatitis C infection must be reported to the local State or Territory Health Department. Enhanced hepatitis C surveillance involves the collection of additional information in cases of recently acquired infection, primarily related to how hepatitis C infection was acquired and why the person underwent testing. It can also be used to obtain information that should have been provided under routine surveillance but is sometimes incomplete, such as Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander status.

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