BBV & STI Research, Intervention and Strategic Evaluation Program (BRISE)-ASP

The challenge: 

Research into sexually transmitted infections (STI) and blood borne viruses (BBV) in Aboriginal communities has become of paramount concern due to escalating and disproportionate notifications rates, compared to non-Aboriginal people. 

BRISE-ASP aims to:

  1. Assess current STI and BBV screening and management activities in Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHSs).
  2. Draw on the experiences of specific projects in what factors have been successful in increasing STI and BBV testing and management.
  3. Investigate opportunities to combine and link particular aspects of project with local health districts and other partners, to maximise the sustainability of successful strategies.
The project: 

This project will build an evidence base of effective STI and BBV testing and management strategies in the ACCHS setting. A key component of BRISE-ASP is that in addition to looking at individual strategies, this project also aims to look at the systems and structures in place that may influence broader healthcare delivery. In addition to strategies implemented by ACCHSs, BRISE-ASP will also consider strategies led by local health districts, and other collaborators, such as key stakeholder NGOs.

The method: 

Through a consultation process, a number of NSW ACCHSs will be identified and invited to contribute to BRISE-ASP. Information will be gathered from participating ACCHSs through ‘site-assessments’, and interviews with key staff members. These approaches will help inform the role that ACCHSs and partners play in STI and BBV testing and management. 

Additionally, a systematic review of published and non-published evaluations from STI and BBV projects conducted in ACCHS settings during the last five years will be conducted. Non-published projects will be also sourced through consultation with the Aboriginal community controlled sector and other key stakeholders.

The results: 

The project is due for completion in February 2017. Interviews with staff members working in sexual health in ACCHS settings are currently being completed and analysed for key themes. The systematic review is also currently being finalised for a quantitative analysis. These two components will inform the development of the final report of recommendations.

The impact: 

The findings from BRISE-ASP will help inform future strategies and programs for STI and BBV testing and management in ACCHS settings. Most importantly, it is anticipated that BRISE-ASP will provide insight for how multiple strategies can best be combined, including creating opportunities to involve partnerships (such as between ACCHSs and local health districts), to maximise the effectiveness and sustainability of future programs.

Project contact: 
Professor and Program Head
Project supporters: 
Project collaborators: 

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