The ARM Network

Research program: 
Currently recruiting: 
Yes
The challenge: 

The Western Pacific Region includes approximately 50% of the world’s population and disproportionately suffers from preventable infections. In Australia, students of the Master of Applied Epidemiology (MAE) training program at the Australian National University (ANU) provide response capacity as trainees for national and international infectious diseases outbreaks in the region, but with only around 20 trainees at any one time, the scope of this capacity is limited

The project: 

The Australian Response MAE (ARM) Network1 was established by three MAE alumni from ANU, UNSW Sydney, and the Burnet Institute to address this gap, and in response to Typhoon Haiyan in November 2013. All three founding partner institutions are members of WHO’s Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) and receive alerts and requests for assistance. The Network works with partners from GOARN as well as the Registered Engineers for Disaster Relief (RedR) and is Australia’s only focal point for infectious diseases surge response capacity.

The method: 

ARM maintains a network of deployment ready Australian field epidemiologists and other medical and non-medical public health specialists. Anyone with relevant skills for infectious diseases response can be part of ARM. We review your CV, and if you are appropriately skilled, you will be invited to join the network. For more information or if you are interested in being part of the ARM network, please visit the website.

The impact: 

Since its inception in 2013, our network has grown to over 170 deployment ready members of qualified Australian field epidemiologists and other medical and non-medical public health specialists. Our members have been deployed to many international emergencies around the world and in the region.

For more information, visit arm.org.au.

Project contact: 
PhD Student

Events